Deep-Brain Simulation (DBS) Is A Surgical Procedure That Controls Essential Tremor

Deep-Brain Simulation (DBS) Is A Surgical Procedure That Controls Essential Tremor

Important tremor starts as trembling in one hand and gradually advances to both sides of the body. They harm the cells that manage movement and when these cells start malfunctioning or passing away, other cells in the brain start shooting arbitrarily, causing tremblings.

Dr. Halpern implants around 40 of these devices yearly to assist patients with important trembling.

Thanks to deep-brain simulation, a surgical procedure that avoids nerve cells from firing randomly, tremors can be controlled. The pulses disrupt the spontaneously generated rhythms caused by the randomly shooting cells, thus enabling the trembling to be managed.

Enjoy the video below to discover more about DBS and how well it worked for Terri. Do you know anyone with tremors?

Terri Benedix, an artist specializing in floral paintings, began getting tremblings in 2013 which gradually got worse. After satisfying with Casey Halpern at the Stanford School of Medicine, she chose to get DBS and In July 2020, revealed up at Stanford Hospital for the procedure. The medical group drilled 2 holes in her skull to insert 2 electrical wires. Later, Dr. Halpern used a recording electrode with a microphone connected to it to locate the tremor causing cells by noise. Once he discovered the right location, he placed a stimulating electrode and asked Terri to draw a spiral. She had the ability to draw a really recognizable spiral which made her weep! In a separate surgery a few days later, Dr. Halpern placed the pulse generator simply listed below her collarbone. With the pulse generator activated, Terri was able to draw a straight line and a spiral, sign her name, stretch her arms to the side, use mascara and bring a cup of water to her mouth. Right after, she was texting her family on the tiny keyboard of her phone! It is approximated that triggering the pulse generator decreased Terris tremblings by 90%.

Source: Stanford Medicine

Later, Dr. Halpern used a recording electrode with a microphone connected to it to locate the tremor causing cells by sound.

Essential trembling begins as tremor in one hand and slowly advances to both sides of the body. They damage the cells that manage motion and when these cells begin malfunctioning or dying, other cells in the brain start shooting randomly, causing tremblings.

The pulses interrupt the spontaneously produced rhythms triggered by the arbitrarily firing cells, therefore enabling the trembling to be managed.