Let’s get it clear: Look Ear, I’ve got eyes at the back of my head

Let’s get it clear: Look Ear, I’ve got eyes at the back of my head

The toolkit is a combination of a variety of senses and our nerve system examining and processing these inputs to cause appropriate actions. We do not depend on only one of these senses, however on a mix of them, and are therefore able to compensate to rather some degree if we do lose access to among them.

Eyes

We create much of our gross spatial awareness capabilities in the very first number of years of life as we learn to crawl and then move onto walking– this is why offering powered movement to physically impaired children is so important. Along the way, we are learning how far do we need to transfer to bump into something or to reach something? From there on, its a matter of fine-tuning this awareness– but what are the tools that the body has to achieve this and where does the fine-tuning happen?

Spatial awareness is vital for our capability to conduct our daily activities precisely and safely. In this short article, we take a look at the numerous inputs we utilize to examine where we are in space and pay specific attention to the function our ears play and what we require to do to facilitate this.

Visual input is very important– we use horizontal and vertical hints, and establish an expectation of shapes and size from these. The majority of us have binocular vision and the minor variation in between what the left and the best eye views gives us the ability to evaluate ranges. Nevertheless, to make best usage of the visual inputs, we need to keep the head consistent, the eyes preferably in a horizontal plane, and the item being viewed in the centre of gaze (Fig 1).

Fig 2. An i2i head and neck support helps place the head (far best), as compared with the prior to position (right), to enable the individual to be able to utilize the screen

Fig 1. Paintings by Frederico Faruffini and Albert Anker of ladies reading. Note the reading area remains in the centre of gaze which is a 15 ˚ cone for optimal black and white, and colour vision

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However if I click my fingers a metre in front of you or a metre behind you, how do you inform which it is, considering that the soundwave is taking a trip the same distance to each ear? The response lies in all the crinkles in the pinna: these include small distortions to the sound waves as they reach the ear and the crinkles are different shapes to the acoustic waves if hit from behind than from in front. Early on in life, we discover what the distortions inform us about the instructions a noise has come from.

Joints

Look ear

If you are offering a head support to keep the head steady, and positioned to optimise the visual field, ensure the person has a correctly positioned and tightened up pelvic placing belt and proper trunk anterior supports.

However how do we understand where the sound is coming from? How can we see with our ears? Part of this is attained by our ears being separated by the width of our heads, so sounds from one side take longer to reach one ear than the other (in such a way, paralleling the benefits of binocular vision in the kind of binaural hearing).

Ears

Additional products can be found at www.beshealthcare.net. Please contact barend@beshealthcare.net if you are interested in receiving further information on the subject.

For their security and for their complete spatial awareness, if you are putting head security on a person, please guarantee that the ears are not covered up and the pinnae are offered to flap easily (Fig 3). This is as essential for youngsters learning to fine-tune their spatial awareness as it is to the senior population with dementia and confusion. For the ages in between, whether say snowboarding or cycling, leave the ears totally free to bring in the acoustic clues and keep the head still and level so that finer motor control of other parts of the body can be attained.

The other crucial part of the ear is the flap on the outdoors– the pinna. The pinna collects acoustic waves and channels them into the ear canal (the external auditory meatus), where the noise is enhanced. The acoustic waves then travel towards the versatile, oval membrane at the end of the ear canal: the eardrum, or tympanic membrane.

Fig. 3 Head covering that allows the ears to flap freely

Therefore, the seating set-up and the quantity and kind of head assistance are critical, particularly for those with bad muscle control (Fig 2).

The other area of our surprise senses is the ears. Inside our ears we have the semicircular canals. When the head relocations, the fluid within the semicircular canals (which sit at right angles to each other) likewise moves. This fluid movement is discovered by hair cells, which then send out nerve impulses about the position of the head to the brain. This sensation ofwhere our head is in area assists our sense of balance, along with input from our feet, backside, etc.

Dr Barend ter Haar has been involved in seating and mobility for over 30 years, consisting of lecturing globally and establishing worldwide seating requirements.

Apart from vision, what other senses help to give us input into our spatial awareness? Proprioceptive receptorsin our joints are necessary– these let us know where little bits of our bodies remain in space, even with our eyes closed. These permit us, with our eyes closed, still to be able to put a finger onto the end of our nose.

Click to learn more from the Lets get it clear series from Dr Barend ter Haar

The pinna collects sound waves and channels them into the ear canal (the external acoustic meatus), where the sound is enhanced. Part of this is accomplished by our ears being separated by the width of our heads, so sounds from one side take longer to reach one ear than the other (in a way, paralleling the benefits of binocular vision in the form of binaural hearing).

The response lies in all the crinkles in the pinna: these include small distortions to the sound waves as they reach the ear and the crinkles are different shapes to the sound waves if hit from behind than from in front. For their security and for their full spatial awareness, if you are putting head security on a person, please make sure that the ears are not covered up and the pinnae are available to flap easily (Fig 3). For the ages in between, whether state snowboarding or biking, leave the ears complimentary to bring in the acoustic clues and keep the head still and level so that finer motor control of other parts of the body can be achieved.

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